Digital Scholarship Project Translations

UO Libraries DREAM Lab COVID-19 Response During Spring Term 2020

Digital Scholarship Project Translations

UO Libraries DREAM Lab COVID-19 Response During Spring Term 2020

Keeping Library Students Workers Employed

Making Digital Scholarship Happen

Keeping Library Students Workers Employed

Making Digital Scholarship Happen

During the COVID-19 Spring 2020 term, the UO Libraries Digital Scholarship Services department pivoted from in-person operations to remote work. Student employees in the DREAM Lab transitioned from supporting faculty and students use of the space into building digital projects for digital research and integrating digital pedagogy into their curriculums.

Over the course of 10 weeks, 6 DREAM Lab student employees worked between 4-11 hours weekly to explore and build pre-existing digital projects (2018-2020) that were built through partnerships and grant funding by librarians, technologists, and UO faculty. With coaching and supervision by Digital Scholarship Services librarians and the Digital Scholarship Specialist Graduate Employee, student workers learned and practiced the basics of building a digital scholarship project, and consulted with other specialists in the UO Libraries.

What did we do?

One of the most frequently asked questions asked of digital scholarship librarians by at University of Oregon faculty and students is “What technology did you use to build that digital humanities project?” During the COVID-19 Spring 2020 Term, the DREAM Lab shifted student employment online 

Together, we built what we’ve dubbed “digital translations.”  We wanted to answer the question with student workers: is it possible to reconstruct a digital scholarship project as closely as possible using another digital technology?

Why did we do it?

Digital Scholarship Services wanted to support the DREAM Lab student workers with employment and continue to support them in building digital literacy and technology skills. We also wanted students to help build a sample collection of different technologies used to communicate digital research designed to contribute to open education, research, and the public good.

How did we do it?

Given a week turnaround during the COVID-19 Spring 2020 term, the DREAM Lab operations and management leaders, Kate Thornhill, Digital Scholarship Librarian, Anna Lepska, Digital Scholarship Specialist GE 2019-2020, and with administrative support from Franny Gaede, Head of Digital Scholarship Services, needed to pivot DREAM Lab student employment from DREAM Lab space management services.

Supervision and management of student employees took shape in a remote work environment. They supported the students in several ways while designing a term-based program focused on enhancing student employment experiences by working on digital scholarship projects. Projects that would be used to support digital librarian research and consultations with faculty and graduate students who keep digital scholarship support.

Ways the DREAM Lab Operations Management Supported Student Employees:

  • Emotional support
  • Pivot to supporting the DREAM Lab while the space was closed, but operations were still in-progress
  • Development of skills to become part of future professional remote workforces
  • Web development skills
  • Actively participating in highlightly reflective processes about digital projects through one on one meetings with digital scholarship librarians and the digital scholarship specialist GE
  • Engagement in critical peer review of digital projects
  • Connections with a UO Libraries Research Data Management and Reproducibility librarian and Digital Scholarship Services Interactive Technology Specialist for project consultants

What are the impacts?

Student Success

  • Working remotely and independently
  • Preparation for jobs requiring technology experiences
  • Build technology resilience
  • Build experience with professional business communications technologies
  • Enhance time management skill
  • Write data management plans
  • Make wireframes
  • Use a specific digital platforms to build a digital project
  • Foundations for the development of an online LIB course focused around digital scholarship

University Research Success

  • Librarians have a new digital research consultation tool
  • Prepare undergraduate students to engage as digital project assistant for faculty seeking research assistants
  • Highlights digital scholarship projects originally designed to communicate faculty digital research
  • Tool for digital scholarship librarians to use for grant consultations

Featured Student Reflections

Blake’s Takeaway From This Term’s Work

Blake’s Takeaway From This Term’s Work

I think for me, the biggest takeaway from this term is knowing when to “pivot.” With the added stressors from Covid-19, working from home, adjusting to remote learning, and the social issues surrounding the US, things haven’t always gone according to plan. As part of that, now more than ever it is incredibly valuable to know how to be flexible. Within the scope of this project, that meant understanding that certain things may take longer than I had previously anticipated and other things may not be possible at all. It also meant that staying organized and being productive during work hours had to be a top priority to get a high quality end product. There were instances where things...

Blake’s Experience Constructing the Yōkai Senjafuda Digital Translation Project

Blake’s Experience Constructing the Yōkai Senjafuda Digital Translation Project

If you had to describe your experience working through the process of reconstructing a digital scholarship project, how would you explain it to someone who has never encountered a digital project translation? This term I completed a digital translation of the Yōkai Senjafuda digital exhibition. Essentially, this involved translating the already created exhibition from its platform on Omeka S to a new platform using Wordpress. Omeka and Wordpress are designed to fulfill different purposes as platforms and thus, while there is some overlap, a lot of the functionality of one is not easily recreated with the other. For instance, Omeka is commonly used for digital exhibitions because of its...

Featured Digital Scholarship Project Translation

Yōkai Senjafuda

 Digital Translation by Blake Hardin

The March

Digital Translation by Lizzy Palmquist

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